If the buyer does not comply with its own contractual obligations, the seller may terminate the contract and not suffer legal consequences for its own breach. For example, if contracts provide for a period within which the buyer must provide financing or a mortgage, and the buyer does not, the terms of the contract generally state that the seller can terminate the sale of the contract without impact, allowing the buyer to try to find another buyer. Ideally, in the case of a buyer, the agreement should state that he has the right to terminate the contract if the contracts are to be performed. However, the parties are free to remedy the agreement themselves if a party fails to comply with its obligations. Remedies can be as follows: after a real estate contract has been violated, recourse for damages of money is a usual remedy. To obtain these damages, the buyer must prove that he has suffered financial damage as a result of the infringement. The amount of financial damages a buyer can receive depends largely on the national legislation in force. For example, if the seller acted in good faith, the buyer may only receive damages in the form of his acomptt and some additional expenses. An infringement can be any breach of a provision contained in your real estate contract.

However, the remedies available to the non-injuring party depend on the extent or gravity of the offence. As a result, between the signing of the contract and the actual conclusion, both parties must fulfill a number of obligations, which, as a rule, last from 30 to 45 days. There may be many examples of such an offence, such as: the differences between the remedies available to a non-injuring party in the event of a material infringement and a non-substantial infringement are significant. . . .